Zine ZF-octo-3med

Published on July 25th, 2013 | by PRESENCE

0

Auckland Zinefest Stallholders Part 4 Q&A

Illustration above by Sophie Watson

sarahbicycle

slaing

Sarah Laing

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Not my first time – I had a table last year.

How did you first become involved with zines?
I read a book about zines by Pagan Kennedy in the mid-nineties lent to me by my friend Helen (who used the school library photocopier to make her own) but didn’t create one myself until 2001, to go with a fringe festival we co-wrote called ‘Roadslappers’.

How did you come to create your own?
I began making little books out of the comics I posted on my blog, ‘Let me be Frank’.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
My zines are comics – stories from my own life. My tagline is ‘Reading. Writing. Parenting. Angsting’, which pretty much sums it up.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Instant publishing gratification.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Stapling with a splayed out stapler and a rubber and then pushing the points in with my fingertips – I really should invest in a thimble, or a long-armed stapler.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I am a novelist and a short story writer as well as a graphic artist. I just had a novel published this month, ‘The Fall of Light’. I contribute comics to Metro magazine, and I love graphic novels.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
It’s fantastic seeing so many people out there making their own idiosyncratic zines, without having to worry about advertisers or popular tastes – it’s very vibrant and illuminating.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Last year I sat next to Ruby Solly and picked up a couple of her charming zines, and I also got some great Disposable Camera ones off Vanessa Berry. I love Alex Wild’s zines and had fun reading ‘The Constant Losers’ earlier this year. I am a big fan of Brent Willis’ comics and his Bristle anthologies (disclosure: I am sometimes in them), and I have a little collection comics by the Sheehan brothers.

Where can people find out more about your work?
On my blog – sarahelaing.wordpress.com

 

RP_logo

Rebel Press

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?We’ve presented our publications at zinefests in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch as well as the Melbourne Anarchist Bookfair.

How did you first become involved with zines?Ali got into zines after her high school principal censored articles she wrote for the school paper. The principal told her that journalism isn’t about free speech, so she found a medium that is.
Torrance started publishing imminent rebellion when he was a teenager, inspired by anarchist magazines like Thr@ll and The State Adversary.

How did you come to create your own?
Val created her first zine when she was being held on remand at Arohata Prison. It’s called Can’t Hear Me Scream and is about her experiences of prison.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Imminent rebellion collects writing on anarchism, decolonisation, feminism, class struggle and other liberation movements. Not Afraid of Ruins is more of a personal zine about mental health, Jewish identity and random nerdy stuff.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Making the books by hand with the help of our trusty office tools: Printy, Bindy, Crimpy and Guilly.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Writing out invoices. Bor-ing!

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
Hana has a day job designing books, so that’s inspired her work for Rebel Press a lot. We’ve all come from a grassroots activist background in groups like Peace Action Wellington, 128 Social Centre, October 15 Solidarity etc so that also influences the way that we work as a collective.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
We need more of it! NZ publishing is mostly concentrated in the hands of Random House and Penguin, we’d love to see more diy publishing to challenge that.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Mellow Yellow and Mind Lint are two excellent New Zealand zines. We also love a lot of the stuff being publishing by AK Press, PM Press and Pluto Press.

Where can people find out more about your work?
Our website www.rebelpress.org.nz or send us an email info@rebelpress.org.nz

 

Jane_Park

Lane Park

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Yes, this is my first time.

How did you first become involved with zines?
I knew about Zinefest through my friend who is into writing and poetry.

How did you come to create your own?
I am always drawing, sketching and wanting to make things, Zinefest seemed like a fun project to channel all of my idea drops into.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
They are stories about life. things I think about, things I notice. Happiness. A celebration of our contemporary culture.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Brilliant mistakes. + ..no real mistakes.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Getting super excited then confused then having to find you way back one morning.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
At present, Glass. I have been working as a studio assistant at a glass workshop and the medium is so intense & mysterious. Its exciting.
been storming so manyt glass installations :))

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I think its fantastic that so many people are supportive and being more involved in the scene. I’m new to it but from the zines I’ve looked at there are come coolcool stuff being made.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
…I don’t know many names of zines… but Lucy Meyles work is awsome.

Where can people find out more about your work?
lane-park.tumblr.com is where I’m trying to update my work on check it out! :)

 

company logo robot_x_page

Karl Wills – The ComicBook Factory

How did you first become involved with zines?
I’ve always been creating stuff and self-publishing, ever since I was about 11 and selling stuff at school. Our favourite show on TV was the 1960’s Batman and we created The Batalogue which was a catalogue of all these ridiculous bat related items, things like the Bat-Racket, a tennis racket shaped like a bat, just lot’s of impractical and stupid items that could be sold purely on this thin association, clearly what merchandising is about. Though at 11 I wasn’t commentating on “corporate greed” of anything, I just liked Batman.

How did you come to create your own?
I like all the different roles to play, illustrator, writer, publisher etc. It’s hard work with such a little return but feels great when something is completed.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Pretty pictures and cartoon violence.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Making a sale.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
It usually hits about half way into creating any project, the novelty has worn off and it can feel like a slog to the finish.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I’m mostly inspired by film and Television, it takes every medium to create them and the good ones are so rare.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I have no idea what’s going on. Ask me after the zinefest.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
The last zine I really loved was a US publication called ‘Murder Can be Fun’ (circa early 90’s) it focused on man-made disasters, serial killers and other true crime. Lurid cheap thrills basically, like my comics. These days I prefer reading Skeptical Inquirer and other science magazines.

Where can people find out more about your work?
My website is www.comicbookfactory.net

 

rachelr

rrachel

Rachel Margaret Anderson – ray raenbow + party monsters

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
This is my first time! I have made plenty but I usually just leave them in sneaky places and nobody knows that they’re mine.

How did you first become involved with zines?
Back in the days of Misfit Theatre when I was 15 I used to go to shows there and buy zines so..
How did you come to create your own?
I was pretty opinionated so I just made my own philosophy zine when I was 15 at my mum’s work, using their photocopier. Then I just kept making an annual zine called Design Manual which was just collages of technology and fashion + little things people wrote me and drawings by me etc.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Beauty advice, recipes & lots of pictures & maybe some shitty drawings

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Saying what I like and feeling real good about the truth

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Paying for things

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I am inspired by all kinds of music, fashion/style and make up but I guess I’m not really involved in any of those things. I am a professional face painter and I paint kids every weekend, so that is my main contribution to the world. I also take photos heaps which are in my zines, (so I don’t know if that’s ‘other’)!

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I have never thought about it, I don’t really know anything about the scene, cause I am not really involved and that’s why I’m doing this!

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
I like online blogs the most but whatevz, I really like any zines about diy lifestyle and recipes and sometimes I like poems. I don’t know I can’t remember anything right now.. I only buy zines around once or twice a year and usually read them all in one week.

Where can people find out more about your work?
uknowet.tumblr.compartymonsters.co.nz

 

Kirsty-Win-terribledrawing

Kirsty Win – On A Sugar High

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Yes, my first time at zinefest on the other side of the stall. I’ve attended Auckland Zinefest 4-5 times before though just as a browser/buyer. I’ve also attended a Wellington Zinefest (just so happened to be on the same weekend as a BookCrossing convention)

How did you first become involved with zines?
I remember reading a letter published in TEARAWAY magazine in my early teens where someone wrote about their zine and it fascinated me. I started looking up different distros and ordering zines a couple of years later from Moon Rocket, Red Letter and an Australian distro called Vox Populis. The very first zinester I met in person was Shasha (from Melting Pot Massacre and Mellow Yellow) who ran a small Christchurch based distro at the time.
To someone from a small town (I lived in Greymouth from birth until I was 22) who hadn’t travelled much beyond family holidays it opened up a whole new world for me. I’d place my order (by mail and paying cash. I got very good at taping coins to cardboard) and as soon as the zines arrived I’d spend a couple of hours reading through them. Then I’d re-read some more.

How did you come to create your own?
The first zine-ish thing I did was a newsletter called Fanlink when I was just starting high school. It ran for about three issues and was mostly ads for penpals, swap pals to exchange boy band memorabilia and a couple of articles.
The first actual zine I made was when I was seventeen and had been reading zines for a couple of years. On A Sugar High issue one featured a lot of music related things, excerpts from chatlogs between myself and my penpal Jess, poetry from another friend and was mostly rushed together the night before a concert. I cringe at it now (and I’m not sure if any copies of it remain) but at the time I was super proud of it. I took copies to school for my friends, showed my teachers and gave it to the bands I saw live.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Unashamed dorky geekery.. thoughts on reading and writing.. tangents.. and a lot of love.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
That anyone can put their ideas out there and through events like zinefest you can connect with people.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
I’ve got a reading log zine to get out to my swap buddies and my printer decides to jam. The printer is running out of ink. I’m missing half my master copy.
Organisation is key, kids!

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
Zines are my main creative outlet but I take inspiration from all kinds of things. I dabble in fiction though haven’t really finished any of the many novels I’ve started. There’s a dark and abandoned corner of the internet where fanfiction I wrote as a teenager lurks. Ask me about it and I might admit what it is.
I read a wide range of books which inspire me also. My love of reading and writing itself is one of my main inspirations – I write because I love to read. I love words and the sharing of ideas & thoughts.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I think it is strong with so much talent. In addition to Auckland Zinefest one of my must attend events each year is Overload (formally Doujin Overload) which is a manga/anime/comic convention. There’s a lot of awesome zines and comics being produced in New Zealand, it makes me excited to see what’s next.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
So many zines that I like it is hard to choose a favourite. Brainscan by Alex Wrekk is definitely one I rate highly.
Mainstream stuff – I used to be a big reader of music and gaming magazines but it seems nowadays I buy food related magazines. I’m sure there’s some conclusion waiting to be drawn here but I’ll move along..
Oh and comics. I love all kinds of comics.

Where can people find out more about your work?
I’m addicted to twitter and I tweet about my zines on there (in addition to a lot of other things) @alkalinekiwi
I’ve started a new blog which is empty right now but I’ll be posting about my zines in the lead up to Auckland Zinefest – http://alkalinekiwi.blogspot.co.nz/
And of course there’s email: litbitszine@gmail.com

 

hannah Moris

Hannah Morris – Now What?

Is this your first time showcasing a zine?
If not, where have you presented zines before? We are first timers.

How did you first become involved with zines? How did you come to create your own?
We were looking for a personal project to do and we saw this was coming up so we jumped at the opportunity to design and create something.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Our zine’s context is our take on our experiences and thoughts on graduate life. The spreads will include an exploration of our thoughts, snippets of our conversations and general musings on where we find ourselves after study.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
I guess the creative freedom, being able to design it how we want.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
The money side is a bit of a constraint. It would be nice to have more colour printing in our zine.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
We defiantly love publication design but we are also into environmental design. We enjoy designing things in 3D and designing in a space. We were involved in Urbis Design Day where we designed an installation with Design Assembly, which we enjoyed.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
Events like Zine Fest are helping to develop NZ’s DIY publishing scene and it’s growing.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
We are new to the zine scene but our favourite mainstream publications are Frankie, IdN, IDPURE, NO magazine.

Where can people find out more about your work? You can visit our websites
https://hannahmorrisdesign.sqsp.com
http://www.behance.net/annaraemorris

 

Eli

Eli – (Cool Trash/Kakelake)

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Nope, I have showed my zines at various zinefests over the years.

How did you first become involved with zines?
I think I first heard about them in Tearaway magazine actually! Then I got properly into them when I discovered punk at 16.

How did you come to create your own?
After reading about them in Tearaway and looking them up online I attempted to make my own, having never seen an actual zine before. I think I was still pronouncing it as rhyming with ‘spine’ too because I’d never heard the actual word out loud.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Lots of information about subjects you didn’t realise you needed to know about. Justin Bieber. My current zine is called Cool Trash, named after the tabloid in Jem and the Holograms.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Getting to control every part of the process myself, writing about whatever I’m interested in at that moment in time. I also love zinefests and meeting other zine people and trading zines.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Photocopying and folding! I hate it. Also trying to motivate myself.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I’m a painter and I’d say the subjects of my paintings are fairly similar to the subjects of my zines.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
Um, it’s great. Lots of interesting people making/writing interesting stuff.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
My fav zine of all time is Lisa Carver’s Rollerderby. My fav zines of the last few years are No Sleep, S.S.N., Journal of Symonds St Studies, Seeing With No Eyes.

Where can people find out more about your work?
My website kakelake.blogspot.com and this interview with me from the Pantograph Punch: http://pantograph-punch.com/never-say-never-the-ersatz-fan-art-of-eli-orzessek/

 

Richard_PORTRAIT

Richard

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
No, I am involved in Potroast zine as the designer, so I’ve helped out promoting and selling Potroast at Auckland and Wellington zinefest in the past.

How did you first become involved with zines?
Again, mostly through being involved with Potroast, but tangentially through the indie comics scene.

How did you come to create your own?
After seeing people at zinefest exploring really interesting ideas and getting them out there to an audience, I thought it could be a good way to get down some of my less serious ideas.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
My table isa shared table, so you can expect to see a couple of my zines, as well as work from Potroast contributors and the Potroast editors, I’m also an art teacher and will have a couple of zines that my students have made.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Having total creative control over what you are producing.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Promotion and financing.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I’m primarily a sculptor, but I also love making digital work. Comic books and science fiction novels inspire me, as well as nature documentaries and rap music.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
Lots of cool people making lots of cool things.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Health Wealth and Happiness, Anything by Lucy Meyle or Sarah McNeil, and Potroast of course. Fantagraphics books and McSweeneys are my favourite mainstream publishers.

Where can people find out more about your work?
Potroast.co.nz

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


About the Author

Started in 2008, PRESENCE ZINE (originally called Presence Magazine) is a window into a lifestyle of bohemian coolness. It is for people looking for something new: bands, writers, comedy, photography, fashion designers and artists.



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to Top ↑