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Published on July 19th, 2013 | by PRESENCE

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Auckland Zinefest Stallholders Part 3 Q&A

Illustration above by Sophie Watson

Potroast 1-11

Potroast

Editors – Makyla Curtis & Boris White
Designer – Richard Richards

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Potroast is up to issue 11. Most of the past issues were showcased at Auckland and Wellington Zinefests. In fact Issue 10 sold out at Wellington Zinefest last year two weeks after the launch! We were pretty stoked about that.

How did you first become involved with zines?
In regards each of us individually, Makyla produced The Deformed Paper before Potroast, Richard is an art teacher and his students have been making zines this year – some of which will be at Zinefest, and as for Boris, Potroast is his first foray into zines.

How did you come to create your own?
Potroast was founded by Ya-wen Ho in 2009 to fill the void left by The Deformed Paper. It turned out to be a very different and very exciting publication.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Potroast is an eclectic, visually focused object. It’s about bringing words and images together to challenge and complement each other.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Giving people an opportunity to get their work out to an interested readership.
It’s also great reading hundreds of submissions with no idea what gems you are going to find.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Rejecting people’s work is pretty hard. The financial aspects of it can be kind of uncomfortable.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
Visual art, design, architecture, literature, science, music. Because there are three of us, our influences come from all over the place.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
There are a lot of brilliant people doing a lot of exciting stuff.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Ours, obviously. We like McSweeney’s. And we’re also pretty excited by the zines made by our contributors – Nicola Brady, Lucy Meyle, Marc Conaco, Simon Gennard, to name just a few. There is some absolutely stunning work being put into zines, which is why Zinefest is so exciting. We can’t wait to stock up our zine libraries.

Where can people find out more about your work?
Our awesome website www.potroast.co.nz or they can buy us a coffee in Auckland or Wellington and have a good yarn.

 

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Sophie Watson – Sophie Oiseau

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
My first time was at Zinefest in 2009, I had a funny little zine about a mole who got drunk and couldn’t find it’s way home, the running joke was that he kept getting the wrong hole. Somehow it won highly commended! Also I co-ran The High Seas, a gallery/shop which stocked lots of zines, but that was all showcasing other people’s stuff.

How did you first become involved with zines?
I think through living with interesting flatmates, and their interesting friends.

How did you come to create your own?
Well finishing things has always been the hardest part of the process for me, the whole process of collating… and printing… But I’ve booked a table at Zinefest this year so I will be forced to finish something.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Lots of bad jokes, lots of nice pictures.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Coming up with ideas for zines, that’s the fun part, when it’s all cerebral and you don’t have to actually make the thing.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Printing things and getting them to a finished state, it’s not my strong suit.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
Printmaking, my paintings are becoming increasingly print influenced, using limited colours and thinking in layers, which come in handy for painting with gouache. I would love to do more screenprinting or riso printing, I love how it looks, all soaked into the paper but I find colour registration totally infuriating.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
It seems to be going strong. The High Seas really paved the way for some great things LOL.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
I love the comics/zines of Lisa Hanawalt and Michael Kupperman (Tales Designed to Thrizzle), also everything put out by London based Nobrow Press. Everything they touch is gold.

Where can people find out more about your work?
I’m slowly getting my website up and running, in the meantime I have a blog: http://confettiyeti.blogspot.com/, and Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/SophieOiseauIllustration

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Henry Christian-Slane

How did you first become involved with zines?
I have liked making my own comics since high school and throughout uni. Does anything self published and creator owned count as a zine? I guess the first time I actually called something I made a “zine” was an art book and comic I made for Chromacon.

How did you come to create your own?
I was inspired by a 20 minute warmup comic that I drew earlier in the year. I expanded it a bit and then added some extra digital drawings I hadn’t used for anything yet.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Art and stories by me.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Not having a brief to cater to and complete freedom from purpose.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Restrictions on print run and costs.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I use Photoshop with a digital tablet, pencil, oils and acrylic

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I haven’t really experienced enough of it to say anything intelligent about it.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Most of the artists I’m collaborating with make my favorite “zines”, Maxis Apartment 41, Sloane’s zine he sold at Chromacon and Adam’s 4 page free zine from Chromacon are definitely the best I have seen. I don’t really know many others.

Where can people find out more about your work?
My tumblr: http://henrychristianslane.tumblr.com/
Website: http://henrychristianslane.com/

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Laura Gan – AUT Zine Club

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Yes, I’d never even heard of one ’til recently.

How did you first become involved with zines?
Through my friends. They looked like such a fun thing to do.

How did you come to create your own?
I wanted a project of my own to work on.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Illustrations and fairy tales.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
You can do whatever you want.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
You have to do it on your own.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
Children’s books, character design, comics.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
It’s inspiring :)

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
I don’t really have any.

Where can people find out more about your work?
Sometimes I post things on my tumblr: esclavaun.tumblr.com/tagged/laura-s-art

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Ezra Whittaker-Powley – AUT Zine Club

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
This is my very first zine showcase. I was hoping to get around to making Harken in time for last year’s zinefest but then I got lazy.

How did you first become involved with zines?
Well I’ve done a fair bit of publication design as part of my Graphic Design degree, and as well as that I was really inspired to get involved after going to the Auckland Zinefest last year as well.

How did you come to create your own?
As I mentioned, I’ve done fair amount of publication design work and bookbinding as part of my course, so I’ve been hoping to take what I’ve learnt and use my own content. Actually my friend Lauren Stewart decided before me to make a zine (one called Meta-Frolic which should be at zinefest!) and I though that sounded cool so I pretty much copied her.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Well the primary zine that I’m working on is called Harken. It’s basically just a way of promoting all the music that I think deserves a bit of recognition, as well as showcasing some of the art and design that all my talented friends create.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
I like the creativity that it seems to inspire. People make way cooler publications when things like advertisers and money don’t dictate the content.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Well I’ve only just realized how much work is going to have to be done to find all the content and write about it. The design is all done and ready for me, that was the fun part! I’ve been scouring the internet to find the best music to write about and it’s hard to find albums that are still going to be relevant in a month when Zinefest is going to be taking place. Also I’ve found out that I’m not the best at writing.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
Well I’m a designer, so that is obviously my biggest inspiration. I also am hugely inspired by music which should be obvious when you read Harken. And finally I’ve always loved art and so I’m hoping to do some other drawing based stuff for zinefest as well. I also love photography but I’m not very good at it sadly.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
As a newbie this year I’m really excited to be a part of it really. I mean, as an outsider I always thought that everyone seemed too cool and creative and so far that’s all seemed to be true.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
I really love zines and magazines that are beautifully made, things like iDN, Kinfolk, Territory, Smith Journal, Extra-Curricular… things like that.

Where can people find out more about your work?
Well I’m hoping to get a Harken blog up and running really soon, where I can post reviews and playlists and such but I’m a bit busy working on the physical content at the moment. So in a couple of weeks you can head to harken-zine.tumblr.com.

 

richard beard RGB

Richard Fairgray – Blastosaurus

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
I’ve been peddling my wares at Zinefest in Auckland for 4 years now but my main work sees me travelling NZ and Australia at various comic conventions.

How did you first become involved with zines?
I’ve been self publishing since I was 7. I drew a comic called ‘Ghost Ghost’ which I photocopied at school and sold at an athletics day. It went very well so I just sort of kept doing it. 19 years later I found a copy of Ghost Ghost and republished it with new art.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
I sell a range of comics, everything from mini comics to collected editions and graphic novels. I am big print nerd and I get very excited by experimenting with different sizes and shapes of books as well as different kinds of binding. I have comic strips, mini comics, a number of ongoing graphic novel series’ and a number of stand alone stories.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
I enjoy being able to directly connect with people at conventions which is something I obviously can’t do when I’m selling through a distributor or through another publisher. I also like building forts in my lounge from the metric tons of books.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Admin.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I pretty much spend my entire life making comics but I do some very poor animation as well when I have a few spare hours.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I think it’s a shame ZiCoFS didn’t take off. No, I’m kidding. I think it’s amazing to see the intense motivation people have to self publish and I think the more people doing it the better.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Does AmCap count? Technically it’s an online comic but I spend a lot of my time looking forward to new strips.
In terms of mainstream stuff I love Saga, but I don’t really read much in the way of periodicals anymore.

Where can people find out more about your work?
http://www.blastosaurus.com

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Ash Spittal

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
This is my first attempt at making a zine, let alone showing it.

How did you first become involved with zines?
Iv’e been attending the Auckland Zinefest for a few years now and was immediately drawn to the idea of making a publication for the fest. I have always loved drawing and the idea of distributing, sharing images with others through an inexpensive and accessible medium is really appealing to me.

How did you come to create your own?
I finally got around to putting together my first publication in the last few months. I love the idea of making something that you can hold in your hand and distribute to others physically. There is something very grass-roots about it.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
The zine I will be presenting in this years fest is titled ‘The Boy’s Club’. It is an anthology of images intended to represent the diversity of the trans-masculine community in Aotearoa. The characters in the publication are of my own imagination and I hope that they will inspire, educate and entertain readers. Billy is a dairy farmer from Huntly and Quinn is a skateboarding punk-rock tranny-dyke from Grey Lynn. Some of the characters are based on people I know, others are people that I wish I did.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
I have really enjoyed making something that I have full ownership of in terms of the creative process. Making a zine has given me the chance to explore a medium that is completely new to me and it has been a very rewarding process.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
My bad time-management skills.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I am inspired by anything and everything from fine art to children’s book illustrations to manga and anime. I am a painter and recently graduated from AUT University with a Bachelor in Visual Art. Making this zine has allowed me to explore narrative in a way that I have not been able to in my painting practice; which centres itself around pure image devoid of any narrative.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I am eager to learn more about NZ’s DIY publishing scene; but from what I have seen so far, it looks super exciting! I think that DIY publishing really lends itself to personal narrative. This makes it a great platform for people to speak for themselves about their own ideas, experiences or communities. It’s really great to see people using zine-making as a means to distribute and share their ideas with others.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
I’m ashamed to say that I don’t own many zines – I’ll definitely be grabbing a bunch at this year’s fest! My all time favourite publication is the manga Dragonball by Akira Toriyama. The art is perfect and the characters were my friends growing up – Who does’t love Son Goku? Sam Orchid’s autobiographical comics about being a transman in Aotearoa inspired me to write about my experiences as a queer person.

Where can people find out more about your work?
I intend to get my work up on the internet soon – Watch this space!

MConaco_Zine_10x14cm_cover

Marc Conaco

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Yes, this is my first time creating a zine.

How did you first become involved with zines?
Through my involvement with Potroast. Makyla asked if I wanted to do a zine with them and I was very happy to do so.

How did you come to create your own?
The idea for my zine came about 2 years ago. It was a very strange and vivid dream which I sleepily and hurriedly scribbled on a dirty piece of paper, scanned to my Mac and filed away. I am happy to be finally bringing it to life.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Adult themes set in a dream-like state.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
There’s freedom in being able to put whatever you want in this medium.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Nothing as of this moment. But then again, this is my first zine. I’m all wide-eyed and bushy tailed.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I am inspired by picture books about mythology and cultures from the past. And cartoons, I love cartoons.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
It seems to be alive and kicking and I am happy to be involved with it somehow.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Off the top of my head, I like the Unlovable books by Esther Pearl Watson, Roman Dirge’s Lenore and a freaky manga called Octopus Girl by Toru Yamazaki.

Where can people find out more about your work?
Check out my website mcthree.co.nz and my Facebook facebook.com/MarcConaco

 

Appliance

Michelle Beattie - Staff Picture

Michelle Beattie – The current editor of Appliance

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Yes it sure is. I have sent some zines to the CHCH Zinefest for their absentee zine table, so the Auckland Zinefest will be my first opportunity to properly participate in an event about zines.

How did you first become involved with zines?
When I started at Artists Alliance in 2011, I had the opportunity to take over the editor/design role of Appliance. This was also my first proper encounter with zines of any kind and I was intrigued to then discover that there is a huge culture around zine making, trading and selling.

How did you come to create your own?
I was given the Appliance InDesign template by a colleague and I went from there. Over the past year or so I’ve also hand made a few issues which hark back to when Appliance started out in 2002.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Appliance features and profiles artist run space/projects and events in NZ (and occasionally some from further afield too).

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Oh there are two main things I really enjoy. One is the opportunity to tell people about a new gallery or artist that they might not otherwise hear about. The other is that I get to make something with my hands which is a nice treat in this job which is mostly computer based.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Harassing people with publishing deadlines. Ugh.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I also make art.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
From what I have encountered so far it’s very professional and interesting. I love to collect self-published artist books and exhibition catalogues.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
I still consider myself a total zine novice… I hope to find a favourite at the Auckland Zinefest. And I really enjoy reading Hue & Cry: http://hueandcry.org.nz/

Where can people find out more about your work?
Thanks to a lovely intern, Laura Forth from Boston University, Appliance now has a fancy online archive. Check it out here: http://www.appliancezine.org/
You can also find out about Artists Alliance here: http://www.artistsalliance.org.nz/

iliketurtles

Molly – And we’ll call our baby Aaliyah

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Yes! It’s my first zine ever. I’m a painter by nature, and avoid using text/talking about my art because I like the ambiguity of it, but letting myself speak freely has been scary-interesting.

How did you first become involved with zines?
It’s all my girlfriend’s fault. Blame her.

How did you come to create your own?
She made me.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Some autobiographical cartoons, rambling a from an over-thinking anti-social. Maybe some bad poetry if you’re (un)lucky. It’s pink with black spots if you’re looking for it.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
The freedom of being able to talk about anything.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
See above. When given so much freedom, it is sometimes daunting to know what to do with it.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I’m a painter/drawer who likes to take photos. I really like Michael Parekowhai, but that’s not really relevant. I just wanted to throw it out there. Maybe he’ll see this and we can be bff’s. Or not, y’know, whatever.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I’m not really involved, I’ve only seen photos of the previous Zinefests, everyone looks so adorable though. Like a basket of puppy’s.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Your zine (Presence) is my favourite.

Where can people find out more about your work?
Here: http://deadpanextravaganza.tumblr.com

(Sharing a space with…)

 

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Luisa Tora – Diasporadic679

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Yes and no. I’ve never been at a zinefest before, but a friend kindly blogged about my first issue on Urban Viti. I’ve only ever inflicted my zines on some accommodating and very patient friends and family members here and overseas.

How did you come to create your own?
I’d always wanted to make one after reading about zines. Getting ahead of myself I came up with the title first, and then I moved to Auckland, then the How 2 B A Zinemaker workshop at Fresh Gallery Otara (Shot, Fresh!) presented itself, then boom!

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Ramblings of a queer Fijian reformed journalist, former activist, and art student. I’m never sure what I’m going to say or make until I do it. So I guess we’ll find out together.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
It’s totally self indulgent as far as content and design are concerned. It doesn’t need to make sense. You’re like a zine Judge Dredd – writer, editor, illustrator, publisher, and distributor. It’s great.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self-publishing?
It makes me deal with my procrastination issues. Gah.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I’m inspired by all of them. Yay mediums! Now I’m at art school, I use whatever medium will suit my idea – sometimes photography, sometimes drawing, sometimes moving image, sometimes multimedia thingys.

What are your thoughts on New Zealand’s DIY publishing scene?
I think it’s really cool, and I admire the passion and commitment of the people involved. I’d like to see Maori and Pacific people more involved.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
My girlfriend’s (as yet untitled and un-made) zine, of course.

Where can people find out more about your work?
Buy my zine. Please. Thanks.

 

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About the Author

Started in 2008, PRESENCE ZINE (originally called Presence Magazine) is a window into a lifestyle of bohemian coolness. It is for people looking for something new: bands, writers, comedy, photography, fashion designers and artists.



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