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Published on July 11th, 2013 | by PRESENCE

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Auckland Zinefest Stallholders Part 2 Q&A

Illustration above by Sophie Watson

 

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Ellen Moorhead – Women’s Monthly

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Yep.

How did you first become involved with zines?
I live with the Puds who did Zinefest last year and after people enjoyed/laughed at my drawings I thought it would be fun to actually put something together and scam their fans into liking me more – I’m way nicer than those jerks.

How did you come to create your own?
One day my boyfriend and I were talking about how stupid hag rags/celeb mags were and came up with a bunch of fake stories. And then he was like “you should draw that”, and then I did.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Celebrity garbage/trash/lies.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
No deadlines.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
No deadlines.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
OK!, Famous, Women’s Weekly/Day, Keeping Up With The Kardashians, X Files, TVNZU.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
Are staples bio-degradable? Can I use them as firewood?

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
The Internet.

Where can people find out more about your work?
ellendegenerateart.tumblr.com or @ellendegenerate on Twatter.

 

 

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Rachel – Grafik Heart

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Third time showcasing them in person at an actual zinefest.

How did you first become involved with zines?
The first zine I ever read belonged to a friend. It was a collection of fan written letters to people like Britney Spears, Beck and Madonna. After that, the first zine I would pick up frequently was This Is Not A Comic. I started ordering Zines through places such as the Cherry Bomb Comics website and started creating my own from there.

How did you come to create your own?
I needed a creative outlet that wasn’t related to designing stuff for other people.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
My zines are all kind of humor based, to do with stuff like old advertising aimed at women, my own outfit choices as a child, drawings and stories.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
The planning of what I’m going to make and seeing a stack of finished zines on my desk.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Sometimes halfway through making something, I run out of steam and it can take me ages to get going again.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I am mostly just a paper junkie. I love almost all aspects of print, and letterpress. I also like taking photos with Toy Cameras.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I don’t really know much about the “scene” but I like attending Zinefest, and everyone I have met so far at previous ones has been really friendly and encouraging of everyone’s work. Not in an arty wanker kind of way, but in a really genuine and cool way.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Some zines I love are Daily Secretion, Imaginary Windows, This is Not a Comic, Sweet Valley 69, Kunt, and Teen Witch, but there are so many more.

Where can people find out more about your work?
Grafikheart.com

 

 

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Beth – ducklingmonster

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
No. I have participated in Auckland, Welington, Dunedin Zinefests. I also curated the music zine library at the Audio Foundation.

How did you first become involved with zines?
Me and my bro grew up self-publishing monsters and our adventures. As a teenager zines became a way of finding out about and sharing ideas about music and politics. Mostly I don’t see a distinction between zines and comics.

How did you come to create your own?
Creating zines/comics/music was a way of participating and communicating in my community.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
The zines I make now are collections of the paper kipple that accumulates around me. They are fanzines to my current crazes. There will be drawings, setlists, found notes, flyers, mail, catalogues, scribbles and scraps.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Lots of voices. Getting it done.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Not enough voices. Sick of Helvetica design politeness and privilege.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
Music. I play in a bunch of bands. In many ways the d.i.y practice of my music making is very similar to how I approach zines. I like music that is raw and like to work thematically and trashily.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
NZ has a shit government that is screwing us over. Its my feeling that in such a climate D.I.Y publishing is essential as it allows for voices of descent. The scene is strong.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
At Auckland Zinefest I’m Iooking forward to new issues of No Sleep, Mellow Yellow, Kvnt, Dreary Modern Life and Cool Trash. I like Silent Army Storeroom’s output most recently Dailies. Comic Book Worksop. Oats Comics.

Where can people find out more about your work?
http://radiocola.tumblr.com/

 

 

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Kyle Boonzaier

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Yes, this is the first time I have attempted to hustle zines to a public audience.

How did you first become involved with zines?
I have always have a passion for producing publications (large and small) but never doing more with them besides gifting disappointed Uncles and Aunties on christmas. After travelling throughout the world, always managing to source Zine stores and events in places like Melbourne, Cape Town, Amsterdam, Copenhagen and Berlin it felt about time I gave something back to this growing community of creators and collectors.

How did you come to create your own?
From varied sources that are of inspiration to me. I am still in the process of creating my zine so stay tuned for a more definite answer.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Color, wonder, confusion and 30 pages of interactive excitement.. maybe. Or just pure hollow disappointment at a reasonable fee.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
A balanced combination of counting those silver coins and creating a piece of work equally inspires myself and the reader. All done on the cheap and bound with love. I also enjoy sneaking back into University and using their printers..

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Paper cuts and not being able to pass the blame when realising the truck load of spelling errors.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I try involve myself within as many art related projects that I can, all with a focus around community and creativity. I am currently involved within The Foreign Legion (Amsterdam), Third Floor Studios (Auckland) and Lostravellers (Location unknown). These three projects keep me on the my toes and the people involved within daily and are a constant source of inspiration .

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I am still learning the ropes around NZ’s DIY crowd but feel events like these are a really positive insight into the future of youth organised art and culture events for New Zealand. I feel there is no way but up for NZ’s DIY scenes and excited about the future of it.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Favourite zines at the moment are usually found through meathaus.com. I am really enjoying the published work by Will Lauren and Simon Landrein at present. Mainstream publications that I froth over are Monster Children, Kinfolk and Paper Sea Quarterly to name a few. They are all quality magazines, beautifully designed with a refreshing and honest array of content.

Where can people find out more about your work?
Have a peek at my illustration work found though– beansewer.tumblr.com or lostravellers.co.nz where a bundle of exciting travel related adventures can be discovered!

 

 

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Laura Macfehin – Fit to Print

Is this your first time showcasing a zine?
Yes! This is my first time at Zinefest and I’m very excited.

How did you first become involved with zines?
I used to spend a bit of time in comic book shops and the like in the 90’s, and I’d pick up other people’s zines there, but I’ve only started messing around with my own this year.

How did you come to create your own?
I used to write reviews and the like for mainstream magazines, and while I enjoyed parts of it I found it difficult not being in control of the end product. I liked the idea of presenting my stuff directly to people, free of charge.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
I’ve been an obsessive collector of mid twentieth century needlework and ‘women’s’ magazine for a long time, and I also like the idea of broadsheets in the more historical sense. To look at my zines may seem to be replicating the past, but I am not really interested in doing that– I like the idea of creating documents from an alternate past (not revisionist). I find that imagining an alternate past helps in creating a more interesting future. My zine contains book and film reviews as well as recipes and ‘how tos’.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Glue sticks and total control.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
The cost.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I also write fiction; poetry and short stories. I’m inspired by all sorts of mediums. I love books, films, radio.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
To tell you the truth I don’t know all that much about it, which is part of the reason I’m doing Zinefest– I want to see what other people are doing. I’ve mainly taken inspiration from the musicians in my life who more and more look for alternative ways to bring their work to the public. I’d like to do the same with my written work.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
I used to love ‘Found’ magazine, I don’t know if that’s still going.

Where can people find out more about your work?
At Zinefest!

 

 

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Liam Bowen – Seeing With Closed Eyes/Coolguys

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Heya, this isn’t my first time selling zines, I’ve been making small press publications with my buddies for the past 6 or 7 years at past Auckland zinefests and craftwerks. The Auckland small press scene is super supportive and friendly!

How did you first become involved with zines?
I was actually making soft toys when I was 15 or 16, and I sold those at an Auckland event “Craftwerk” and after I started making comics, I also sold them there.

How did you come to create your own?
When I was about 15, my parents showed me the film “American Splendour” about Harvey Pekars collaborative masterpiece with comic artists – I was drawn in by the art and personal beliefs of Robert Crumb, one of the artists who he worked with, and that drove me to draw and self publish my own comics. I was also a member of a now defunct group that liked pasting drawings in unexpected public places like offices, or walls or grills. That was really exciting.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
When people read my comics, they can expect bizarre dreams that people have told me and are often hard to follow, but make sense to me, and follow their own internal logic. You can expect spaghetti arms and mouths like caves, clumsy imitations of my favourite artists and their ideas.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
My favourite part of self publishing is the design stage of comics, when I’m drawing out the panels on the page, I try to give each page a unique panel arrangement. It feels very satisfying giving each page symmetrical panels.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Making the pdfs at the end and finding that printing costs are higher than expected…

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I love comics and feel great attachment to that medium.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
NZ has a great small press scene, my favourite highlights would have to be “Instant Intensity” any comics by Sam Thomas and Wellingtonian comic maker Tim Bollinge

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Anything by Jim Woodring, Robert Crumb, I’m also a big fan of “Herbie” by Ogden Whitney

Where can people find out more about your work?
www.coolguys.me/liam is my webcomic, but I also have a pretty huge internet paper trail that’s probably not difficult to find

 

 

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Ben Carroll – Buzzferkchurnt

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
This is my first one yea.

How did you first become involved with zines?
A went with a friend to one and I hadn’t really heard of them before and it was awesome.

How did you come to create your own?
I like to illustrate and make up stories for these random characters I draw so it seemed like a natural progression. I have also done a few short comics and that sort of thing and I enjoy it.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
A book that is a mixture of free writing and illustrative exploration sorta thing.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Total creative control and the chance to do something no-one’s ever seen.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Cost vs creative control

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I’m into most mediums I guess. I like illustration and painting but also work in animation and music videos. Graphic design and Photography and I also dabble in music. But I’m always looking for new things and new ways to create and be inspired.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
It’s quietly growing and bubbling beneath the surface getting ready to take it to the next level I think, though that could just be due to my limited exposure.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
I don’t know too many by name but everything I’ve seen has been it’s own sort of awesome.

Where can people find out more about your work?
Mostly on tumblr, or even Facebook. Getting a new website in the works after my current projects complete which should be soon.

 

 

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Nicola Brady – Auckland Zinefest Committee

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
I’ve been to a tons of zinefests – mostly in England where I’m from, but last year was my first year presenting in Auckland.
I had a little table and four half size zines, and got to sit next to the lovely Potroast people who had a huge table covered in zines and comics!

How did you first become involved with zines?
Through friends who were keen zine makers – including my friend Daniel England who wrote/drew a zine called Constipated Rhythms for years!

How did you come to create your own?
I created my first zine as a colaboration with my friend Anne, it was The Lean Green Thrilling May Zine, all about the possibilities of different leaning.
It mostly featured illustrations, and a ukelele tab for Jo-Lean Jo-Lean.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
My zines are mostly full of pen and ink illustrations of rickety structures buildings, but also include cartoons. The most recent zines I made were based on buildings in Auckland, with a map of interesting ones in Ponsonby.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
I love seeing the finished result of many hours of drawing, scanning, cutting out, sticking, stapling…. and it’s really awesome when someone picks it up and decides to get a copy!

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Trying to get things done by deadlines, I seem to pile up things on my To Do list – but then again, I’d never finish anything otherwise, so this is a good thing really!

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I’m learning about Calligraphy and I love hand drawn type! I’m also realllly impressed when I read peoples poems and short stories, some people have such a gift for writing! I’m a picture person!

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
NZ has a really supportive DIY publishing scene, there are so many talented and driven people involved with creating something! It’s exciting to be a part of it and get to know some of the makers!

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
I love design and craft magazines like Frankie and Extra Curricular, a zine I have recently found and loved was the Pie Paper edition ‘Failure’ – some really funny illustrations, I particularly liked the ‘Graph showing a related effect: “Mt Stupid” on pg 41.
http://www.piepaper.com/
I also really loved ‘Vincent needs work’ zine which I picked up in Wellington Zinefest last year, really funny and close to many of our hearts!
This is the guys blog http://vincentneedswork.tumblr.com/

Where can people find out more about your work?
nicolabradystudio.com

 

 

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Kenneth – monoAmono

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
This will be my first time showcasing a zine.

How did you first become involved with zines?
Mainly through friends, and the odd one I’ve picked up during my travels.

How did you come to create your own?
I’m a big fan of images and text in print form, so just thought I’d give it a go and pull together some of the bits and pieces I’ve made and collected over the years.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
There will be some humour, comic panels, drawings, photographs, diagrams and text.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Being able to make sense and nonsense of the world with some independence, and hopefully being able to learn something in the process.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Editing.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
My main gig at the moment is making drawings, paintings, and objects.
I get inspired by people, and the things they make.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I guess it’s a pretty active scene, and that there is a diverse range people who put stuff out on physical and virtual formats.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
I don’t know many of the titles, but have got a kick out of the few zines I have encountered over the years, hopefully be able to do a few trades at Zinefest. Mainstream publications and material I’m into are TV Guide, Popular Science, Fangoria, The Ring – Wrestling, ToyFare, Jaycar catalogues and whole bunch of comics.

Where can people find out more about your work?
kenneth00merrick.wordpress.com

 


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Simon Gennard – Things We’re Not Going to Talk About

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
This is my second time at Auckland Zinefest.
I’ve attended Wellington Zinefest three times. The first couple of times I was just keeping a friend company behind her stall. Last year was the first time I was selling my own work.

How did you first become involved with zines?
A friend of mine, Anna Duckworth, used to make a zine called The Collectivist and she had asked me to contribute a few times. The first Zinefest I went to was in 2009, on the recommendation of Anna, I spent about two minutes in there before getting really anxious and running away. I was curious enough to return the next year, but I relied on Anna to hold my hand and get me through it.

How did you come to create your own?
I had intended to make a zine for a long time before I actually got around to doing it. I guess I got distracted, or couldn’t commit myself to any one idea. I committed myself to finishing the first issue of Things We’re Not Going to Talk About during Wellington Zinefest 2011, shortly after Anna had told me she was moving to New York. Maybe it was a symbolic torch passing, maybe it was good timing. Things We’re Not Going to Talk About was always intended to be in a serialised format, so finishing the first issue, having tangible evidence of my own work, provided the motivation I needed to keep going.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
My work is based on conversations. Things We’re Not Going to Talk About was, in essence, a series of interviews with friends. That series is over now, or on an extended hiatus, but I’ve continued processes of information gathering that I learned while making it. I’m currently interested in the way we use language to locate ourselves, how we talk about our surroundings to identify ourselves with a particular place.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
I don’t necessarily feel like I’m part of a community, because outside of Zinefest I don’t really have much direct contact with other self-publishers, but I do feel like people are really genuine. Self-publishing, by its nature, lacks the competitive element of a lot of other mediums. When you’re creating things in an institutional setting, you’re competition for a limited number of spots in a particular program, or you’re competing to be best in your class, so a lot of interactions are coded. Compliments are either tainted with envy (if someone’s work is better than your own) or vindication (if you happen to think your work is better). This may apply only to me, it is quite likely that no one else does this and I am a terrible, terrible human being.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
I find it really difficult to motivate myself when I’m not bound by deadlines. I tend to apply arbitrary deadlines for myself, but if a project isn’t taking the shape I want it to take, I tend to just give up.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I study English Literature and Art History. I consider zines to sit uncomfortably between the two. Perzines and poetry zines and the like are informed by a literary tradition, but there’s an autonomy over production that really isn’t granted if one chooses to publish something traditionally. When I write I’m thinking simultaneously about what I’m saying and how it’s going to look on a page.
I don’t really feel like an artist, nor do I feel like a writer though.
I intern at an art gallery and every so often a patron will assume I’m studying fine arts and ask me what medium I work with, I’m always met with this incredulous stare when I tell them I make zines.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I can speak only for Wellington, but there seems to be a real enthusiasm for self-publishing in the city. There’s a small but significant community of really engaged individuals working here, and they’re supported by infrastructure like the public library and Creative New Zealand and I think that’s contributed to a real growth in interest over the last few years. I think the zine collection at Matchbox Studios has really helped open the medium up to a new audience. Previously, people really had to be looking for zines to know where to find them in Wellington, but because Matchbox is both a gallery space and a shop, a lot of people have stumbled upon some really great work that wouldn’t have been seen otherwise.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
I really like Potroast and Minarets. Both of them publish content of a consistently high quality. I feel sleazy saying that, considering I was in Potroast once. Maybe we can consider that a lapse of judgment on their part.
I recently discovered Lucy Meyle’s work. It’s so beautifully presented. I’m hesitant to take my copy of All Message Play Back out of its plastic packaging.
Someone I know once called me Bryce Galloway’s biggest fan. That’s probably not inaccurate. He asked to borrow my lighter once. It was amazing.

Where can people find out more about your work?
I have a website. I don’t update it very often. www.notgoingtotalk.com

 

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About the Author

Started in 2008, PRESENCE ZINE (originally called Presence Magazine) is a window into a lifestyle of bohemian coolness. It is for people looking for something new: bands, writers, comedy, photography, fashion designers and artists.



2 Responses to Auckland Zinefest Stallholders Part 2 Q&A

  1. Pingback: Nicola Brady » Presence Zine – zine interview

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