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Published on July 3rd, 2013 | by PRESENCE

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Auckland Zinefest Stallholders Part 1 Q&A

Illustration above by Sophie Watson
 
AndrewMcLeod1

AndrewMcLeod2

Andrew McLeod – The BMCT

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
yes i have endured a few zinefests over the years

How did you come to create your own?
temptation on the photocopier

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
evil

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
showing off

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
composition

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
art, music, science

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
too monocultural. and mono political..

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
encerns

Where can people find out more about your work?
audio foundation, children of vision

Benedict Independent Woman Records

Benedict – Independent Woman Records

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
I have been self publishing material since I was about 10 years old I sell exclusively through mail order or in person. I am and will always be present at zinefests in Wellington and Auckland launching my wares.

How did you first become involved with zines?
I have always been an avid consumer of comic books and music, through the discovery of D.I.Y labels and fanzines in New Zealand and America and a disdain for what was happening around me I was inspired to create my own.

How did you come to create your own?
Through a drive to silence the voices in my head and around telling me I was never going to create anything.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Music, comics and movies through my perspective. I have no interest in peddling bullshit on people or faking an interest in anything to maintain an image, everything I write about or publish I do so out of a love of the art.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
The finished product.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
The final weeks of build up to completing an issue.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I’m not sure how to answer this. My school of thought is that the artist and their identity is the artwork and that any work in any medium is systemic ov thee artist and thee artist’s ideas. Whether it be musick or zines or even painting it is all one work as thee life ov thee artist.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I choose not to engage with “scenes” as I find it often inhibits creativity and nurtures a smugness in mediocrity that repulses me.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Strips, Eightball, Alter Ego, Cock, Heavy Metal (up until around 1990), Destroy All Monsters, 2000AD (before 1990), Slayer.

Where can people find out more about your work?
Conversing with thee artist and writing to thee artist.

Lucy Meyle

Lucy MeyleOn The Exhale 002

On The Exhale – Lucy Meyle

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Last year I was at the Auckland and Wellington Zinefests, and this year so far I’ve tabled at Sydney Zine Fair at the MCA.

How did you first become involved with zines?
It was a natural extension of my artistic practice, making semi-narrative drawings. Also, being part of the zine community was really attractive to me, everyone is so supportive and excited about self-publishing.

How did you come to create your own?
I made an experimental comic for my Honours project, and that was my first zine. From there I have just continued publishing, trying to keep my output focussed. I try and approach each new zine or comic as an experiment, so I always end up learning something new.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
People seem to ask me ‘but what does it mean’? a lot, which is interesting and also sort of a compliment. Why do some people want everything explained to them? I’m trying to come up with a way to politely refuse to tell them without sounding like a jerk.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Making something from start to finish is a pleasure- doing the drawings, organising paper stock, doing the printing, folding, binding, etc.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
That sometimes I am more ambitious than my finances allow, and that can be really frustrating.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I have drawings which don’t get made into zines, and I also have newly re-learned how to screen print.
Right now I’m focussing on how to work with colour and be a better draughtsperson, so I’m really into Aurel Schmidt’s intricate drawings, as well as the colour and composition of photography by Osma Harvilati and Sam Falls.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
Its interesting and diverse, but also quite small- which makes it exciting because I feel there is room to push boundaries without feeling self-conscious.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
My favourite comics work is by Aidan Koch, Lala Albert, Chris Deforge and Simon Hanselmann. As for mainstream publications, I always enjoy reading Dazed and Oyster.

Where can people find out more about your work?
My website: lucymeyle.com, or my blog: lucymeyle.tumblr.com

 

Hana Aoakeiwanttoholdthepresent

Hana AoakeChickontheSpit

 

Hana Aoake – Dreary Modern Life

Is this your first time showcasing a zine?
No. I was apart of the Dunedin Zinefest last year.

If not, where have you presented zines before?
I’ve been making zines since I can remember, except they were more craft orientated than the photocopied kind. I got really into making zines with a photocopier when I moved to Dunedin when I was 15.

How did you come to create your own?
I made a zine in Dunedin for almost three years called Marrow, which was released monthly. My friend Kari (who makes Femme and Oddities, an Amsterdam based zine) and I wanted to make a zine focused upon Dunedin. It matured over time, but I stopped making it when I moved to Auckland, because it required so much time and energy that I didn’t have anymore. Now I’m making a new zine, Dreary Modern Life, which isn’t as broad and will be sporadically released. I have always made one off zines.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
I guess my one off zines are pretty funny, extremely detailed and made with tender love and care. I am making a meat porn series at the moment. I’m interested in the relationship between meat as a consumable product and the absent referent to the dead animal in meat eating culture, so they examine this with the intention of being both repulsive and attractive. There’s only one copy of each in the entire world. They will be packaged really carefully and I will be reluctant to sell them to anyone who doesn’t appreciate the time it took to make them. Some took me over a week to finish. Dreary Modern Life will be printed as a ‘zine zine’ in a limited print run. I will release it online also.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Touching the paper and smelling it after it’s been printed. It isn’t creepy and you wouldn’t understand unless you slaved away for months to put something together.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
Picking up a zine I’ve made off the floor of a party and finding it’s totally ruined.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I make performances, videos and installations. I’ve written a lot about performance art, jewellery, installation, craft, fashion, etc. Everything interlinks everything.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I think people like David Merritt have really inspired people to start making zines in the traditional photocopying sense and by also encouraging people to start reusing the materials around them to make little publications. Overall I think it’s alive and well in most cities, but am yet to come across many zines in Auckland that aren’t at least 20% advertising and just not really what I would’ve ever previously considered to be a zine. But it’s difficult to ascertain what constitutes a zine and what doesn’t. Although, I really dig the collection at Audio foundation, but those zines are from all over the country.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
I really love the Wellington zine Incredibly hot sex with hideous people, Permanent Vacation, Femme and Oddities, White Fungus, the Dunedin comic book collective’s zines, Auckland based ISON and the zines my friend Piupiu makes. I don’t buy magazines, other than trash mags to cut up and make into Kimye zines. I don’t like to be told what products I should buy, how I should look and what I should think. I guess I still read Vice, but I definitely prefer to just read those articles online, rather than grabbing a copy.

Where can people find out more about your work?
I guess by emailing me drearymodernlife@gmail.com or going on my blog bellaandmadeline.blogspot.co.nz. I’ll do a small print run of Dreary Modern life, but I’ll put it on Issu at some point, so it can be accessed online.

Little Caravan

Ruby Solly – Little Caravan Publications

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
I started out with zines last year with Auckland zinefest then Wellington zinefest later in the year. LCP has had zines in a few independent bookstores and vintage stores, I think that’s a good little platform for them.

How did you first become involved with zines?
I’ve always been a bit of a paper hoarder. I’d come across these little booklets in cafes and things and read them over and over again. It got to the point where I had a huge box full under my bed that i’d paw through on wet afternoons.

How did you come to create your own?
When I was a nipper I was always writing , it just grew and grew until one day I thought that self publishing would be a good way to have a record of what I was writing and give me the ability to connect with other writers. So I set up LCP, got some friends on board to design covers and I haven’t looked back yet.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Poetry, prose, unsent letters, general rants, people you won’t know, old stamps and pictures of my parents.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Either coming up with ideas at the beginning or hand sewing spines at the end. I simply couldn’t pick.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Two words. Malfunctioning typewriters. I’ve honestly had so many typer issues this time around, usually I can fix them myself but these ones have baffled me. If you know of a good typewriter fixer let us know and we will supply them with reading material and cake in exchange for their services.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I’m a cello player and singer primarily, but play other instruments as well. I think it’s good to be able to have a few different artistic mediums to dabble in, if I’m trying to get a poem out and it just won’t flow I can take it to the cello and have a go at doing something with that instead. They seem to help each other too, as I get more into both songwriting and poetry (zinestering) I’m finding them more and more similar in their processes.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
Everyone is so encouraging! I remember being terrified at my first zinefest last year, I felt like a 16 year old kid with a box of papers being thrown into a scary place that I didn’t feel comfortable with. But everyone was so nice to me and I felt really at home in that group. We’re all a little bit crazy, a little bit ragged, a little bit chipped but I think that’s what I like about us zinesters. We’re all different together, kind of a weird form of solidarity.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
David Merret’s zines (Landrover Farm Press), he is a very perceptive man and a ten minute conversation with him contains what most people would say in an hour. He gives the essence of things. I’m a Minarets fan as well and I’m looking forward to watching it grow. Mainstream wise? I really like Frankie and Rookie, the feminine aesthetic coupled with articles that target big issues, with a bit of light relief on the size (why yes, I would like to know how to make ginger wine, thank you for asking).

Where can people find out more about your work?
LCP can be found online at www.facebook.com/LittleCaravan
Our email address is up there too so we can all write each other letters (well, emails) and be pen (well, computer) pals.

the puds

Matt & Sam – Stop Being a Pud

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Matt: Stop Being A Pud was at Auckland Zinefest last year. Also one time Sam went to the Los Angeles Art Book Fair because that’s just the kind of guy he is. He took a bunch of our zines and gave them to people, but when Lena Dunham came up and bought some actual proper produced books or some shit off him he didn’t give her a free zine because he’s a dipshit. He got way too scared and thought she’d judge him and call him a mysoginist or something. Clearly, I’m over this.
Sam: Look about the Lena Dunham thing. I’ve never really figured out how to apologise for that. I just got star struck and all I could think about was ‘Holy shit she’s actually talking to me like I’m a real human being.’ That burden still sits heavily on my heart. I’ll bake you an apology cake on the first anniversary of my treachery.

How did you first become involved with zines?
Matt: Yeah, Sam, how did we get involved with zines? You’ve been around them for ages, I think one day I just said ‘do you wanna do zinefest’ since we had so much material from our now very neglected website.
Sam: That’s pretty much it. I started doing zines when I was in a happy collaborative relationship. That relationship turned into some unhappy mutually assured destruction and I pulled back. Then I got into another happy collaborative relationship with Matt and it started again.

How did you come to create your own?
Matt: With a smile and a ribbon in my hair.
Sam: InDesign.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Matt: Whiney jokes about how girls scare us. And how dating is hard. And how having a boner makes you an idiot. Probably a lot of stuff about celebrities, some stuff about comics, but mostly stuff you could Freudulate about us being only children. As in not having siblings. Also we’ll be showcasing a zine from Perfect Hair Forever I think. Or whatever he’s going to call himself this time.
Sam: A jambalaya of low self-esteem, arrogance, pop-culture references and probably a ball-point pen drawing of male genitals somewhere.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Sam: When I was at art school I really got into self-publishing as a political act. Plus I’m attracted to the weirdness, bombast and lack of fear that self-publishing affords someone.
Matt: You get to write what you want. You don’t get that freedom anywhere else. Apart from the internet. And in real life. And if you’re a columnist. And in your diary. But you know, it’s just fun.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Sam: That one guy at every zinefest who reads the whole zine cover to cover and doesn’t pay the exorbitant one dollar cover price for a copy to keep.
Matt: Oh yeah! That guy’s a DICK.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
Sam: Patricia Arquette and I were on the same alt.net board for awhile?
Matt: Everyone loves podcasts. Apart from the New Zealand media industry.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
Sam: It seems pretty healthy really. Zinefest’s happening on both islands and a lot of really killer stuff getting made. I’m always a little bit confused about where DIY ends and Independent starts though.
Matt: It might seem like it’s limited to St Kevin’s Arcade, but it’s not.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Sam: Thanks to my friend’s killer collection I have access to a lot of old punk zines like Hard Times and general ephemera like 1920s hand-assembled cricket club newsletters. I’m more into that stuff than current zines (sorry) because they’re entrenched in a time that we’re now really far removed from and I get off on nostalgia. I sort of stopped buying magazines, but I like reading Vice, Jacobin and other left-leaning hipster shit.
Matt: I read comics more than anything else. If anyone wants to talk about mainstream comics I’m your guy. Yeah, I love Fantagraphics as much as the next person, but Batman’s amazing and Jean Grey is on my fucklist. But you were asking about zines. Um… I dunno, a coffee table book from someone’s personal Twitter? I’m looking your way, Harris Wittels. That’s a zine idea that became a mainstream publication. Personally I just look at zines my flatmates get because I’m uncultured.

Where can people find out more about your work?
Sam: Google.
Matt: Last year’s zinefest.

Marc Streeter

Marc Streeter – Actionman Adam

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
No. I’ve attended previous Auckland Zinefest events, and also sold my comics at other events like Chromacon and Armageddon.

How did you first become involved with zines?
My particular focus is comics, and basically that just came about from wanting to draw and tell my own stories.

How did you come to create your own?
My comic came about as a way for me to tell some stories about a friend of mine. He made me laugh a lot, and I thought it would be funny to tell some fictional stories with his character. Using some aspects from real life, and a lot of imagination.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
My comic is called “ActionMan Adam”. It’s about a young Canadian who is living in Christchurch on a working visa. He’s a hopeless romantic, so he is looking for love. It’s hopefully something that will make people laugh and smile, while this young guy kind of fumbles his way through life.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Self publishing is great! You can do whatever you want. There are no rules. You control everything – (maniacal laugh).

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
I don’t think there is a downside for me. I always find it fun.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I use the internet a lot, and put my comics on there. Like self publishing it doesn’t take much to have your own space on the web and do whatever you want there.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
It’s cool. Great to see so many people putting their own voice out there.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
I look at lots of other comics for the most part (surprise, surprise). There are lots of great NZ comics. Too many to recommend. I like Toby Morris’ work a lot (Alledaags: A Year in Amsterdam). Dylan Horrocks (Hicksville). Matt Emery (Pay through the Soul). Frank and Becky (Tiny Kitten Teeth). I like too many to list I’m afraid – but google those names and you’ll have a good starting point.

Where can people find out more about your work?
I can be found online at www.actionmanadam.com. It’s where I post comics and thoughts. Cheers!

Sam Orchard

Sam Orchard

Is this your first time showcasing a zine?
Nope

If not, where have you presented zines before?
I’ve been at the Auckland Zinefest for the last couple of years 😀 I love being involved!

How did you first become involved with zines?
I love reading zines, I can’t remember when I got into them, but I’ve been reading them forever. I love how easy and accessible they can be.

How did you come to create your own?
I first started making my own as a way to share my comicsI’ve been drawing comics for a long long time now, and made a comic zine for my friend when I was first coming out as gay. It was a helpful way to explain gender and sexuality through comics, and share them around.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
I make short comics that I put into my zines that explore sexuality and gender. I write stories about what it means to be queer and trans in New Zealand, to share stories about our differences, and our connections.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Sharing stories and swapping zines

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Having to find ways to get them printed!

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I write a webcomic – www.roostertailscomic.com

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
Love it!

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
I really love Mellow Yellow, from Auckland, and DUDE, from Melbourne

Where can people find out more about your work?
www.roostertailscomic.com

Brent Wiliisart

Brent WiliisBCW1970

Brent Willis – BCW Publishing

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
Not really, I did my first self-publication in 1997 and I’ve done many more since then. About 50 or more I reckon. They’ve been available in all manner of random places, other zinefests, Armageddons, comic shops, zine outlets, the occasional fair and art gallery. Mostly around the Wellington area. But they have made their way to other countries as well.

How did you first become involved with zines? How did you come to create your own?
I come from a comics background. Back in 90s most NZ comic makers self-published their own comics due to the lack of a comics industry in NZ. Most of these were photocopied and look like zines. Because I liked zines and I liked comics that look like zines, it was inevitable that I would make comic-zines too.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
Comics mostly. Roughly drawn ones that mix high-brow and low-brow humour.
My most recent publications are zines called “Wark” or “Whark” which are a mix of comics, drawings, reviews, travel stories, and esoteric ramblings. My other recent publication is a comic anthology called the ‘Bristle Annual’ which contains comics made by various comic makers from Wellington and further afield.

What’s your favourite part of self-publishing?
Having total control over a project and seeing it through until the end when it’s all photocopied and ready to read.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self-publishing?
Reading the freshly copied product for the first time and realising I didn’t proof-read it as well as I should have.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
I also play guitar and do vocals for a band called the False Dmitrys. We don’t play out much but we self-release some very limited edition CDs now and again, in much the same way as I self-publish zines.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
It’s a very active and growing scene. Modern technology and greater access to computers has made it easier to put out better quality zines but also creates the risk of gentrification of what is mostly an amateur activity. There is however a lot of people who do zines online in the form of blogs, which often get a bigger readership. But there are still a lot of people who like to have something tangible to hold in their hands and read. Some people do both.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Mostly I like comic zines although there aren’t so much of these in NZ. Funtime comics are still going and although they have gone a bit upmarket in the last decade they’re still good. Especially their latest one. I think favourite NZ self-published comic would be an old one of Simon Adams called ‘the Amazing Mosquito Man’. Back in the 80s, Jesus on a Stick was a very influential NZ comic zine for me. I also found a self-published comic called ‘Marmoset’ that was produced by two Dunedin schoolboys in the 1970s, which I think is great. I also used to like music zines, especially old NZ ones like ‘Garage’ and ‘Alley Oop’, but as I get older I get less interested in modern music. From more recent times, I like ‘Daily Secretion’ and probably others that I can’t remember right now.

Where can people find out more about your work?
I don’t have a web site but if anyone wants to ask me anything about my work they can email me at celfbw@xtra.co.nz

GarySilipa2

 

Gary Silipa – The Good, The Bad

Is this your first time showcasing a zine? If not, where have you presented zines before?
It’ll be my first time showcasing my zine ‘The Good, The Bad’.

How did you first become involved with zines?
I had seen a few before but it never caught my attention as something I wanted to do. It wasn’t until I started to make my own that I really learned and appreciated what they are all about.

How did you come to create your own?
My friend Elliot O’Donnell got me hyped on trying to make one at the beginning of the year (2013) so he showed me the basics of laying it out on the computer and then I figured out how to print, trim, staple, and try to distribute on my own.

Tell us a bit about what people can expect from your zines.
They can expect to see a random assortment of photos I’ve taken, art that I’ve made, images I’ve arranged in a way that I find interesting so hopefully readers will too. All of the content in these zines is mine so you kind of get an idea of who I am, places I’ve been to, that kind of stuff aswell.

What’s your favourite part of self publishing?
Being able to produce a publication that is completely mine with no one telling me what I can or can’t do.

What’s your least favourite aspect of self publishing?
Not being able to produce them in large enough quantities with the resources available to me.

What other mediums are you inspired by and involved with?
Painting is my main squeeze but I really enjoy doing anything else that’s visually creative and hands-on. When it comes to inspiration I like music and being excited visually.

What are your thoughts on NZ’s DIY publishing scene?
I don’t know anything about it but I’m keen to meet and greet others who are doing it aswell at the Auckland Zinefest to share tips and ideas.

What are your favourite zines and mainstream publications?
Umm..

Where can people find out more about your work?
www.thegoodthebad.co.nz

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About the Author

Started in 2008, PRESENCE ZINE (originally called Presence Magazine) is a window into a lifestyle of bohemian coolness. It is for people looking for something new: bands, writers, comedy, photography, fashion designers and artists.



2 Responses to Auckland Zinefest Stallholders Part 1 Q&A

  1. Pingback: More Auckland action | Beef Knuckles

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